24K Gold Plated Tibetan Buddha Gau Mala

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24K Gold Plated Tibetan Buddha Gau Mala

275.00

This beautiful Tibetan Gau Mala is constructed of rudraksha, garnet or jade, copper, gold and inlaid rubies and emeralds.  The hand-crafted Nepalese prayer box contains a resin carving of the Buddha. 

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A prayer box, Gau (also spelled Ghau or Gao), is a Tibetan Buddhist amulet container made of metal and worn as jewelry. As a small container used to hold and carry powerful protection objects, the Gau is culturally equivalent to Latin American package amulets, African-American conjure bags or mojo hands, South American charm vials, and American wish boxes. 

As used in Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, and Mongolia, the Gau box usually contains a written prayer or a sacred mantra diagram such as the kalachakra. The prayers and mantras are usually hand inscribed or block-printed by a priest and they are always blessed before use. The Gau is used within this tradition as an amulet - a ritualistic object believed to provide protection from evil.   A Gau box is often embedded with semi-precious or precious stones or coral.  Turquoise and red coral are especially favored in the design of Tibetan prayer boxes.  Other gems used often by the Tibetan silversmith are amber, lapis lazuli carnelian, garnets, amethyst, and even rubies, sapphires and emeralds.

The Gau is usually worn around the neck and hung close to the heart.  Gau is not unlike a transportable shrine. In lieu of a prayer, the Gau might also be used as a container for holding herbs, stones or other objects believed to have protective powers.

The Tibetan Buddhist place an image of Buddha or another deity inside the prayer box.  A Gau is designed with an opening that allows the person to view the image throughout the day.  Alternatively, a cast form of the deity may ornate the surface of the Gau. 

Calling The Earth To Witness / Earth Touching Buddha

This Buddha is depicted with the legs crossed, the left hand in the lap, and the right hand pointing to the ground with the palm facing inward toward the Buddha. This posture is known as Calling The Earth to Witness.  This carving of Buddha depicts the moment after six years of searching and performing torturous austerities to his body he finally was on the verge of enlightenment. Unfortunately, Mara, the Demon of Illusion, tried to dissuade The Buddha from the final last steps. The Buddha meditated all night to overcome the fears and temptations sent by Mara and then called the Earth Goddess to witness that the Buddha achieved enlightenment in order to share with the rest of the world. Witnessing that, the Earth Goddess wrung her hair, releasing flood waters that swept away the Demon Mara and all the temptresses he had released.